Our Services

Our Services

Traditional Worship, Contemporary Worship, Church Bells, Holy Communion.

Traditional Worship

Bethlehem Lutheran offers a traditional form of worship every Sunday except for the month of August. From September through July, we worship at 10:00 AM except for the last Sunday of the month when we worship at 8:00 AM. All of our worship is projected on a large screen in the sanctuary. During the month of August we participate in a Mission Festival with three other churches, the second Sunday of the month is held here at Bethlehem at 10:00 AM.

Our traditional worship service relies on the Lutheran tradition of liturgical worship and is accompanied primarily by the organ. The four major components of worship are Gathering, Word, Meal, and Sending. We gather together as a community of faith through confession and forgiveness or a call to worship, sing a traditional hymn, pray and chant the opening liturgy (Kyrie and Hymn of Praise). We listen to God’s Word through the reading of and listening to the Holy Scriptures, singing of the Hymn of the Day, listening to the Children’s Sermon with Puppet Ministry on week three, we listen to the Sermon, and confess the Apostles’ or Nicene Creed. We share the meal and celebrate the Holy Communion every Sunday. We are then sent with prayers for the people, the Lord’s Prayer and a Sending Hymn. We are sent back out into the world to serve Jesus in our everyday lives.

Contemporary Worship

Bethlehem Lutheran offers a contemporary worship service on the last Sunday of the month at 10:00 AM. This service follows the same liturgical pattern as the traditional worship service (Gathering, Word, Meal, and Sending). This service is contemporary in that it utilizes contemporary language and music. Worship is lead by a praise team consisting of a keyboard, electric guitars, drums, and vocalists. Again, all of the worship is projected on a large screen in the sanctuary.

Church Bell – the bell is tolled at the beginning of each worship service as a call to those in the community that worship is starting. Additionally, the bell is tolled five times during the Lord’s Prayer The bell is also tolled at the death of a member and is tolled for the number of years of life.

Holy Communion – When this meal is celebrated we are reminded that this is not the pastor’s table and not the community’s table. It is Jesus’ table. Jesus invites us to come and be fed by the bread and wine which are his body and blood given for the forgiveness of sin. Jesus is the one who has redeemed us and places us back into a right relationship with God and with one another. All are welcome at the Lord ’s Table because God’s gifts are free. Children and young adults who have not received first communion are invited to come forward to receive a blessing.

Monthly Readings

Monthly Readings

September 2018 Readings


 Sunday September 2 – Pentecost 15  

Narrative: In today’s reading, Jesus continues his ministry of healing. He heals Peter’s mother-in-law and countless others. The awkward or interesting part of the story is that the moment when Peter’s mother-in-law is healed she gets up to serve Jesus and his disciples. My first thought is that couldn’t someone else step up and do these tasks. However, the significance of her service is tied to my theme for this day – Set free for a purpose. She not only is freed from her illness but freed for her vocation or calling in life. The question for us becomes what is it that Jesus has freed us to do? How is it that God is calling us? Every time we repond to needs of the people and world around us, we are responding to God’s call and living into the freedom that is ours in Christ.

Readings

  • Isaiah 40:21-31
  • Psalm 147:1-11,20c
  • 1 Corinthians 9:16-23
  • Mark 1:29-3

Sunday September 9 – Pentecost 16

Narrative: Our theme for this day is more than acknowledging the force of gravity. In our reading, Jesus takes his disciples with him up the mountain and after the period of revelation, transformation, and transfiguration, they come back down again. Certainly Jesus could have chosen to stay on top of the mountain, but he chooses to come back down. Jesus comes all the way down into our brokenness, fear, disappointment, and loss. Jesus’ descent back down the mountain reminds us that we don’t have to hide the hard parts of our lives. God incarnate in Jesus came to us to be with us through the good an bad, through life and death. Jesus promises to be with us through death into new life.

Readings

  • 2 Kings 2:1-12
  • Psalm 50:1-6
  • 2 Corinthians 4:3-6
  • Mark 9:2-9

Sunday September 16 – Pentecost 17

Narrative: In our reading this week, Jesus is driven – into the wilderness by the same Spirit that just earlier had descended upon him and conferred to him God’s profound blessing immediately after his Baptism. Jesus’ identity as God’s child was essential to weathering the temptations and struggles that were to come. In the same way, it is our identity as children of God given to us at Baptism that guides us through the challenges and struggles that await us on our journey as well. It is important for us to note that the Spirit drove Jesus to the wilderness with some purpose. Certainly none of us would choose to go to wilderness places. We don’t look for opportunities to struggle – they happen to us. Notice that the Spirit doesn’t tempt Jesus. In the same manner, God doesn’t want us to suffer, let alone causes us to do so. Our challenge is to recognize that God is at work both for us and through us during our wilderness times.

Readings

  • Genesis 9:8-17
  • Psalm 25:1-10
  • 1 Peter 3:18-22
  • Mark 1:9-15

Sunday September 23 – Pentecost 18

Narrative: A lot of what Jesus says in our reading today just doesn’t seem to add up, at least when we measure it against the world’s standards. So much in our culture is designed to make us think that the only thing that matters, the only thing that will bring us peace, security, and happiness, is looking out for ourselves by gratifying our immediate desires, whatever they may be. However, none of these things will actually make us feel complete. The only thing that does that is connection to others and the community those connections bring. When we stop worrying about gratifying our wants and instead look to the needs around us, and others begin to do the same, we find more than we’d ever imagined. The more we give, the more we receive; the more we seek to be a friend, the more friends we discover; and the move we love, the more we are loved. Taking up one’s cross is not really about sacrifice but choosing to serve others rather than self.

Readings

  • Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16
  • Psalm 22:23-31
  • Romans 4:13-25
  • Mark 8:31-38

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Sunday September 30 – Pentecost 19

Narrative: A lot of what Jesus says in our reading today just doesn’t seem to add up, at least when we measure it against the world’s standards. So much in our culture is designed to make us think that the only thing that matters, the only thing that will bring us peace, security, and happiness, is looking out for ourselves by gratifying our immediate desires, whatever they may be. However, none of these things will actually make us feel complete. The only thing that does that is connection to others and the community those connections bring. When we stop worrying about gratifying our wants and instead look to the needs around us, and others begin to do the same, we find more than we’d ever imagined. The more we give, the more we receive; the more we seek to be a friend, the more friends we discover; and the move we love, the more we are loved. Taking up one’s cross is not really about sacrifice but choosing to serve others rather than self.

Readings

  • Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16
  • Psalm 22:23-31
  • Romans 4:13-25
  • Mark 8:31-38

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